Creation
Draft
Initial
Detailed
Accepted
Adoption
Idea Description
Supplementary Information
Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
ORCHA is the world’s largest Health App library ORCHA has been designed to offer local targeted app stores to engage populations and to support professionals to recommend the best apps to their patients.

Overview of Innovation:
ORCHA, the Organisation for the Review of Care and Health Applications, is an SME specialising in the rapidly developing world of health and care mobile applications and related digital health services. The medical and wellbeing app market is growing fast, offering the prospect for clinicians and patients to better monitor, report and manage multiple health challenges. Apps exist and are in development for a wide array of users, ranging from solutions that remind and assist people with essential activities, to approaches that monitor key physiological parameters to improve management of multi-morbid long term conditions and to improve quality of life through enabling social interaction.



There is growing evidence that apps can improve outcomes for populations and patients, however, there is currently little independent review to ensure their effectiveness, safety or value to users and professionals. This limits user and professional confidence, the growth of app businesses, and also constrains the opportunity for the UK population to take advantage of apps to address major health demographic issues while potentially reducing load on public resources. The sheer scale of emerging apps in health and care also actively inhibits the use of these services, as patients, carers and their health and care professionals struggle to find the right solutions. Finding a clear and trusted pathway through these congested waters is a critical enabler of any wider digital health strategy. ORCHA provides the solution. It delivers a clear and robust approach to the review, validation and dissemination of these services and through this core capability creates an attractive powerful and multifaceted digital health hub that patients, carers, health and care professionals and developers themselves are all able to utilise to drive this critical agenda.

The ORCHA platform has been designed to consist of multiple ‘white labelled’ variants, which are all driven by a common repository of review information and associated data. Through this approach it is possible to create solutions targeted for particular geographies, conditions or cohorts, enabling the key ORCHA components to be seamlessly integrated into existing public facing and professional facing solutions.
Stage of Development:
Market ready and adopted - Fully proven, commercially deployable, market ready and already adopted in some areas (in a different region or sector)
Similar Content1
Overview summary:
This initiative aimed to improve understanding of the challenges pharmacies face in the adoption of technology enabled care services (TECS) focussing on efficient medicines utilisation and adherence.  
 
20 pharmacies from North Staffordshire were approached with 17 agreeing and 5 remaining through to completion.  The patient cohort was defined as those with prescriptions for COPD, asthma, diabetes type 2, diuretics, NSAIDs or back pain with protocols developed by the WMAHSN LTC Network.

Further details on the study can be accessed here
Challenge identified and actions taken :
The challenge was how pharmacists might utilise TECS to add value to the delivery of the New Medicine Service (NMS) and Medicines Use Review (MUR) and Prescription Intervention Service at the point of dispensing, in the integrated care of patients. 

The aim was to improve patient convenience, experience and increase understanding of their conditions and thus improve patient participation in self care with subsequent clinical benefits and associated cost benefit in medication usage. 

The project focussed on:
  • Recruitment of community pharmacies then agreeing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) detailing expectations under the project.  The MoU included a bursary of £500 for participation in training, identification and recruitment of patients, data capture and evaluation (Appendix 1);
  • Training to pharmacists followed by the licensing of pharmacies for Florence simple telehealth with ongoing on site support from local clinical telehealth facilitators and the Local Pharmaceutical Committee (LPC);
  • Protocols in the specified LTC's providing TECS introduction pathways (Appendix 2)
  • Florence and Manage Your Health aide memoirs
  • Baseline survey of participating pharmacies at project inception and a post participation survey (Appendix 3)
  • Patient feedback on Florence 
  • Patient feedback on the Manage your health app 
Impacts / outcomes: 
This was designed and delivered as a discovery project. As a consequence, the impacts and outcomes are limited to learning.  Based on critical reflection and consideration of the evaluation and surveys completed as project actions the project team identified where the project could have been more impactful in terms of retaining the participation of those pharmacies that expressed an interest. Then better retention and participation rates could have secured higher incidence of TECS adoption from the cohort of patients covered by the project.  These conclusions and the resulting recommendations recognise the small numbers involved and that further exemplar projects would be required before at scale roll out could be considered.
 
17 community pharmacies expressed an interest and progressed to training and receipt of the MoU and were deemed to be fit to participate – five of these accredited pharmacies went on to complete the project.  The number of interactions (contacts with patients) reached 88 realising 93 incidences of patients becoming engaged with or interested in TECS (patients could elect for either / both Florence and the Manage Your Health app).  The demographics of the patients reached during the project shows 5.7% (5) to be children (<20years old) and 19.3% (17) to be older adults (> 59 years old).  With an even distribution of participation by gender (42M / 46F) and by condition the willingness of patients to consider TECS when introduced by the pharmacist could be considered high as the 88 patients – based on participation data collected at the pharmacy – converted or stated an intention to convert to simple telehealth or an app.
 
The conversion rate supported the hypothesis that community pharmacies are in a position to introduce and generate adoption of TECS during their participation in a single patient focussed care plan.  However, if the project was to be replicated more attention would be required in the recruitment and preparation of the participating community pharmacy teams.
 
  • The MoU in itself was helpful for recording and agreeing the basis of participation but it could have contained more on the objectives and outcomes expected from participating pharmacies;
  • Experience showed that while the strategic involvement of the pharmacist(s) was fundamental to placing the project in context for the pharmacy the pharmacy staff (including counter staff) were better placed to manage the interactions with patients on the practicalities of enrolling with Florence or the downloading and then utilisation of the Manage Your Health app;
  • Training for the pharmacy team would be better delivered out of hours or by remote delivery (e.g. skype) as the day to day operations of the pharmacy made the delivery of training during opening hours problematic with frequent breaks in the training being required and on some occasions the training could not be completed within the time slot allotted for it;
  • The community pharmacies without exception had sufficient private space in which to interact with patients but they would benefit from more mobile IT to improve the content and value of the interactions e.g. by demonstrating TECS on an iPad to an interested customer;
  • In project planning, more could be done in helping community pharmacies understand patient flows and when this type of activity might best be done – during the project more than 40% of activity took place on a Friday with 20% on a Wednesday;
  • Survey at inception showed a healthy degree of scepticism on behalf of pharmacists as to the demand TECS would make on their colleagues but that TECS was an important and legitimate part of the pharmacy role. They agreed that the introduction of TECS into patient care was desirable and likely to improve their outcomes – the post participation survey illustrated that pharmacist time with patients was the key factor in patients adopting TECS (within the constraints of the project offer) and that TECS should be part of the pharmacy menu of services; and
  • Future initiatives would benefit from a much closer link with the outcome responsibilities placed on community pharmacies for NMS, MUR and the prescription intervention service as the project did not provide any causal link from the pharmacy activity to medication utilisation, adherence of cost effectiveness in prescribing.
 
It is worth noting that the demographics of the patient cohort recruited suggested significant levels of participation by older age groups generally considered to be ‘digitally excluded’. However, in the post participation telephone survey – albeit for small numbers – pharmacists reported patients not having a mobile phone (telehealth) or a smart phone or tablet (Manage Your Health app) as only occasional incidental occurrences.
Which local or national clinical or policy priorities does this innovation address:
Care and Quality Health and Well Being Health Education England’s Building a Digital Ready Workforce. https://hee.nhs.uk/our-work/developing-our-workforce/building-digital-re...
Supporting quote for the innovation from key stakeholders:
During the post participation survey the following comments were noted based on conversations with the participating pharmacists and pharmacy teams:
 
“Patients felt that the info on the Apps was reliable rather than just looking on the internet”
 
“I can see the benefits of using technology ………… new launches always take time, cannot expect new service to be instantly successful.  Once established and embedded expect it to be more successful”
 
“It would be good to have a self-service portal (in the pharmacy) i.e. tablet/lap top for patients to use to become familiar/comfortable”
 
“Pharmacist would have liked more telephone support”
 
“Delivering healthcare technology is easier than pharmacists believe …..”
 
“(The) Service is easy to sign up to but (I) just haven’t got the time. …….. apologies for lack of participation but owners not prepared to commit to staffing required”
 
“Try to link patients’ info and needs with the pharmacy from GPs.  Create better awareness – leaflets, posters, media and promotional material – poster/leaflet to encourage patient/customers and make aware
 
Please note:  These references are from notes taken during the post participation telephone survey and have been presented out of the context of that survey and the individual discussions that took place and, in some instances, represent multiple responses on the same or similar themes.
Plans for the future:
The learning from the initiative was substantial and consequently there would need to be significant redesign before it was run again.  There was much to commend the project recognising that it ran for a short time and yet the take up or conversion rate to the TECs offer was in itself significant and therefore of value in the context of what the project hoped to achieve.
 
The case for another initiative involving pharmacies and pharmacy teams is strong providing there is a greater emphasis placed on how their investment of time in introducing TECs impacts positively on pharmacy relative and important outcomes.  There is a valid argument for developing and introducing a currency for this work that is of value to pharmacies.
 
Since this initiative, Healthy Living Champions have been introduced into all pharmacies in Northern Staffordshire and it would make good sense to have them involved in this type of initiative in the future. Healthy Living Champions have a role to promote Public Health messages.
Tips for adoption:
The initiative brought home the importance of securing senior pharmacy managers support for the community pharmacists’ wider role, recognising that they need protected time to be effective.

Community pharmacists are motivated to use their knowledge to help patients, and projects like this one should capitalise on this.

If locations, such as pharmacies, are to be the focal point of introducing TECs to patients and the public promotion and support material for use on site is important.
 
Much is assumed about the digital awareness of professionals and employees in health and health care services – the initiative identified that greater digital awareness created by other programmes may help the future recruitment of willing participants from within clinical and healthcare teams and from the public and patients.
Contact for further information:
Tania Cork
Chief Operating Officer
North Staffs & Stoke LPC
taniacork@northstaffslpc.co.uk 
Read more
Hide details
0
0
Votes
-99999

Created by

Share and Follow