Shared decision making
How can we improve shared decision making within patient consultations?
With a specific focus on the co-creation of a simple guide which sets out the key components of 'a good consultation', the use of shared decision making tools in priority disease areas (such as diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease) along with patient and professional education programmes. 

Ideas (Long term conditions: a whole system, person-centred approach)

Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
MyDiabetesMyWay is a proven, scalable, cost-saving self-management platform/app empowering people with diabetes to take ownership of their disease, data and treatment; delivering tailored support from NHS health record/ home recorded data.
Overview of Innovation:
MyDiabetesMyWay (MDMW) has been running since 2008 in NHS Scotland and is now being implemented in NHS England (e.g. Somerset, Manchester, NW London). MDMW is a cost saving (ROI>4:1) online web-based platform with over 50,000 registrants (covering all types of diabetes) funded by NHS/ government, giving patients access to their institutional (NHS) health records, integrating with home-recorded data, utilising algorithms and data linkage to drive highly tailored self-management advice and reports, communications tools and education resources.
MDMW has peer reviewed published evaluation and is an international exemplar having won many quality awards e.g. European ehealth adopters award (2017)/ Diabetes UK self-management award (2015)/ UK Quality in Diabetes Care award (2013). MDMW impacts on clinical outcomes e.g. HbA1C, is low cost (£1-2 per population patient per year license) and offers savings through reductions in complications/ efficiencies in care for NHS providers, and can be rapidly scaled across regions and countries.

THE PRODUCT:
MDMW is a portal/ app encompassing:
  • >200 digital educational resources (text, video, interactive content)
  • Patient electronic health record access (institutional NHS data)
  • Patient self-management decision support with data-driven tailored advice/web links
  • 6 QISMET accredited structured education courses (GDM, Type 1, Type 2)
  • Personalised care planning documents
  • Personalised care quality reporting (e.g. DUK 15 Care Measures)
  • Patient goal-setting tools
  • Communication tools; secure messaging with health care team/ peer discussion groups
  • Remote glucose monitoring support (community upload and sharing of home blood glucose (sugar) readings and feedback).
  • External social media channels
  • Responsive and accessible web/mobile platform design
"Patient access to diabetes records through My Diabetes My Way has meant a step change in the care and understanding of my condition to a level that it has never been. I am much more in control of my condition but importantly I now understand the goals that I should be achieving and am able to have a constructive discussion with my consultant. "

MyDiabetesMyWay is now being rolled out in sites across NHS England.

MyDiabetes Clinical is a complementary clinician facing platform delivering a EHR, automated clinician guidance driven support, and individual and population analytics

http://www.mywaydigitalhealth.co.uk/
E: david.garrell@mwdh.co.uk
M: 07739 529737
E: debbie.wake@mywaydigitalhealth.co.uk
M: 07904154101
Stage of Development:
Market ready and adopted - Fully proven, commercially deployable, market ready and already adopted in some areas (in a different region or sector)
WMAHSN priorities and themes addressed: 
Long term conditions: a whole system, person-centred approach / Wellness and prevention of illness / Digital health
Benefit to NHS:
MyDiabetesMyWay is a novel patient facing intervention which can directly impact on clinical outcomes, quality of life, and improve efficiencies in service delivery. Diabetes is growing health problem with high treatment costs affecting 9.6% of the WM population. Good patient self-management driven by education, empowerment and motivation is key to good outcomes. Diabetes spending may rise over 10 years to c. 17% of the NHS budget.

People with diabetes only spend a few hours per year with health care professionals. The rest of the time, patients self-manage their condition; i.e. - blood glucose monitoring, medication adjustment, appropriate daily foot care, weight management and dietary and activity choices. Self-management is key to reducing costly long-term complications such as ulcers, amputations, blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke/ vascular disease, mental health disorders, sexual dysfunction and neurological complications.

MyDiabetesMyWay delivers cost savings and better outcomes for patients (ref: published evidence), it also improves data transparency for practitioners across primary and secondary care and can reduce the need for face to face education and consultation, improving efficiency in working practices. Regular knowledge updates, feedback on results, motivational support and flexible access to health care staff are key to supporting patients, reducing costly clinic visits, hospitalisations and death due to secondary complications, leading to longer healthier lives with significantly reduced costs.

Technology approaches in diabetes care work well, particularly if they are personalised. Low cost population based solutions are appealing in the current climate of rising prevalence on a shrinking NHS budget. Long-term conditions management needs to evolve to reap the potential benefits of data driven approaches. There is massive potential for wider lifestyle/home monitoring/institutional big data analytics to drive push notifications and automated decision support in real time to patients, which could transform care delivery. Our product development supports this evolution.

MDMW can contribute to the local implementation of the NHS Long Term Plan. EG:

3.81 supporting delivery across primary care to enable more to acheive treatment targets
5.9 & 5.13 People seamlessly empowered by digital tools information and services/digital structured education.

Demonstrable through Tests 2/3/4 (£ releasing/reduce demand for care/reduce of unwarrant).
Initial Review Rating
5.00 (1 ratings)
Benefit to WM population:
Diabetes is growing health problem with high treatment costs affecting 9.6% of the WM population over the age of 16. Good patient self-management driven by flexible access to good quaity information (available in a range of languages), structured education courses, empowerment and motivation is key to good outcomes. MDMW supports acheivement of local 3 treatment (BP, cholesterol and HbA1C) and structured education targets.

People with diabetes (PWD) only spend a few hours per year with health care professionals. The rest of the time, patients self-manage their condition; includes blood glucose (sugar) monitoring, medication adjustment, appropriate daily foot care, weight management and correct dietary and activity choices. Self-management is key to reducing costly long-term complications such as ulcers, amputations, blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke/vascular disease, mental health disorders, sexual dysfunction and neurological complications.

MDMW delivers cost savings and better outcomes for patients and improves data transparency for practitioners across primary and secondary care and can reduce the need for face to face education and consultation, improving efficiency in working practices. This combination of empowered PWD and practitioners with a more complete picture can lead to more frequent co-production of health with the patient at the heart of decision making.
 
Shared Decision Making
 
The MDMW platform is built on the house of care principle which embraces patient goal setting and as the system uses simple algorithms to produce reports to the patient which can be used in the consultation it can enhance the interaction and the outcomes (Key findings from a recent evaluation survey of 1098 MDMW users (63% male) who had logged in at least once prior to January 2015 (27.5% response rate) with representation of all age and socioeconomic groups included that 89.6% felt it helped them make better use of their consultation, 88.2% felt it helped them manage their diabetes better, and 90.3% and 89.3% respectively felt it improved their knowledge and motivation).
Current and planned activity: 
MDMW is currently deployed throughout NHS Scotland. MyWay Digital Health are now implemented/ing MDMW in sites in NHS England, including Somerset, NW London and Greater Manchester. We were selected as one of 11 NHS innovation accelerator programme fellows (2018 cohort) and the Digital Health London accelerator, both of which are supporting adoption.

We continue to develop the product including Artifical intelligence/machine learning, decision support and a corresponding clinician platform through Innovation funding.

This will further enable delivery of the long Term Plan and section 5.29:

"Decision support and AI ... technologies need to be embraced by the NHS, but also subjected to the same scrutiny that we would apply to any other medical technology. In the coming years AI will make it possible for many tasks to be automated, quality to increase and staff to focus on the complexity of human interactions that technology will never master.
See files for company skill profile.
What is the intellectual property status of your innovation?:
Intellectual Property for MDMW is fully assigned to the company from the University of Dundee for exploitation.
Return on Investment (£ Value): 
high
Return on Investment (Timescale): 
2 years
Ease of scalability: 
Simple
Regional Scalability:
Implemented at scale across NHS Scotland since 2008 (currently> 35,000 registrants), Implementing in Somerset CCG and across NW London STP. Working on applications in Greater Manchester and other areas
.
Measures:
Previous Assessment in NHS Scotland:

MDMW clinical impact has been assessed (April 2017) using time-series analysis comparing HbA1c of active users with those in the inactive background patient population (control cohort) matched by age, duration of diabetes, socioeconomic status and gender (7147 interventions (registrants and active users) vs 36020 matched subjects). My Diabetes My Way (MDMW) users demonstrated a sustained 4 mmol/mol HbA1C reduction. Further health economic analysis based on UKPDS complications models and £1 per diabetes population annual charge/ 5-10% registration, suggests a return on investment of around 6:1. User surveys; 90% feel MDMW supports diabetes knowledge, self-management and motivation.

Ongoing Assessment:

- Identifying strategies/ barriers for successful implementation and uptake.
- Gather feedback on new product feature to assist in ongoing product development
- Assess changes in health outcomes, complications prevention and health economic benefits 
- Assess changes in working practices/ care delivery efficiencies e.g. impact on consultation numbers, face to face education, unnecessary screening tests

*Outcomes will be added to the health economic model
Adoption target:
We would aim to offer to everyone in the region with diabetes and rapidly onboard 5-10% of the entire diabetes population in your area in the first 12 months. Our intervention USP is low cost and scalability (at no additional per person cost).
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David Garrell 18/09/2019 - 15:34 Detailed Submission Login or Register to post comments
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Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
A shared decision making tool that helps to organise the psychiatric consultation and empowers the service users with right information to make the right choices.
Overview of Innovation:
John impressed me with occasional sparks of intelligence and wit. When I first saw him in outpatients, he had all too familiar decline in his personality resulting from a severe mental illness.  As a bright young man he was able to secure a place at Oxford for studying history, his long term passion. He was brilliant in his studies but then unfortunately had a gradual decline in studies and in less than one year he had to leave his course.

John appeared hostile in consultations.His mother who supported him in his struggle against voices, delusions and social isolation sat quietly during the appointments, bewildered and confused about what has happened to her very intelligent son.

Despite my best efforts, I could not persuade John to engage in my consultations. He and his mom appeared to be happy with the care but they appeared to have little to ask. The appointments were stereotyped; checking of symptoms, medications, mostly acrimonious debate against continuing treatments and the next appointment.

Once I asked whether they will be interested in few questions which other patients had asked me about their condition. Slightly puzzled as to why a consultant would give them questions to ask (and not answers!), they agreed.  I gave John few questions for each appointment, which either John could explore himself or simply bring them to the next appointment.

Gradually the consultations became more engaging and I could see sparks of brilliance in the questions.John now demanded answers to the questions which became more challenging for me. His mother also asked interesting questions, not merely sitting as spectator. For the first time, I could see the shared decision making in action!

That was the start of QDoc (Questions from doctor). I developed a user friendly mobile application that provides all the questions service users can ask in psychiatric consultation about any aspect of illness. Patients can select appropriate questions for each consultation and also add their own questions or notes. QDoc also has other functions to organise the consultation in most effective way. No more scribbling on pieces of paper and then looking for them in the consultation hurriedly!

I have ideas to develope the utilities and functions in QDoc,making it one of the most powerful tools for shared decision making and self-management. I am keen to collaborate to take this further. QDoc is avialable at Google app store bleow
//play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.syml.mhq&hl=en_GB
 
Stage of Development:
Evaluation stage - Representative model or prototype system developed and can be effectively evaluated
WMAHSN priorities and themes addressed: 
Mental Health: recovery, crisis and prevention / Long term conditions: a whole system, person-centred approach / Digital health / Person centred care
Benefit to NHS:
Non-attendance at outpatient appointments - known as did not attends (DNA) - has a significant impact on the NHS in terms of cost and increased waiting times. It is estimated that around £360 million per year is lost due to non-attendance of appointments in the NHS as  around 11 per cent of patients fail to attend an outpatient appointment which equates to 5 million appointments a year. The rate of psychiatric DNA is about 19, resulting in even greater losses ( see: http://qir.bmj.com/content/3/1/u202228.w1114.full).
An app that helps to engage the patients in psychiatric consultations will result in higher attendance rates and greater patient satisfaction. This will  reduce DNA rates and will achieve significant savings for NHS. It will also help to reduce the waiting time.
Shared Decision Making is the policy priority for NHS as outlined in Department of Health, London, 2012 document ‘Liberating the NHS: no decision about me, without me’. The aim is to increase patient involvement in decisions about their care. There is abundant evidence from research that informed patients have better engagement with services and higher quality of life. Uninformed patients may not be able to access the voluntary sector organization and other resources which can help them to achieve recovery.
When patients go through the questions, select appropriate questions to be asked for each consultation, this will help to organise the psychiatric consultation in a an effective way. This will enhance their involvement in decision making, understand their treatment better and be an active partner in the treatment process rather than the passive recipients of information. Therefore the shared decision making will become a norm rather than exception in those who use this app.
The QDoc is a simple app, which is available at present for the android platform freely. This can be downloaded easily and can be a cost effective way of reducing costs, improving efficiency, decreasing waste and improving patient outcomes.
Initial Review Rating
4.60 (1 ratings)
Benefit to WM population:
The innovation has the potential to benefit NHS in west midlands to reduce the waste and improve the efficiency. The West Midlands has a high proportion of people from black and ethnic minority population. There is evidence that people from BME communities have higher incidence of psychosis, a form of severe mental illness. There is also evidence in the literature that the BME population also has lesser engagement with the mental health services and lesser satisfaction from the services. Therefore the innovation will have added benefits for the west Midlands.
The digital technology companies in West Midlands can potentially enhance the value of innovation, thus contributing to the health and wealth in the West Midlands.
Current and planned activity: 
The QDoc has been used in Black Country NHS Foundation Trust. I received excellent feedback from patients and colleagues, who used the application. The present version is a basic app, which has a generic use. I am now considering the upgrades and development of new functionalities in the app, which will enhance the uptake and use of the app. These improvements will enhance the value of the tool and can lead to use for potential for commercial and business purposes.
The security and interoperability with current systems which are in use currently in NHS is a major priority. The tool also has the potential for integration with other self-management and decision making tools. I have been in discussion with service users groups and IT professionals and now working on upgrades. I am also working on a business model that will lead to creating a revenue stream from the tool. 
What is the intellectual property status of your innovation?:
I own the intellectual property rights
Return on Investment (£ Value): 
high
Return on Investment (Timescale): 
1 year
Ease of scalability: 
2
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saeed farooq 07/02/2017 - 12:44 Publish Login or Register to post comments
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Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
This novel approach  involves people reviewing their medicines in a 3/4 hour session with two health professionals.
We provide people with their own notes in the form of a written action plan, which they can share with clinicians.
Overview of Innovation:
Our work introduces a novel approach to helping people manage their medicines and treatments.

It involves group sessions for patients on medicines, covering what ‘medicines’ are (not just prescribed substances), how they work, side-effects and interactions, alternatives to medicines, finding trusted information and how to have a productive conversation with your Doctor / Health Professional on medicines and treatments.

Following this we offer optional individual support sessions where people can talk about their medicines and treatments in confidence, with two health professionals, one of whom is always a Pharmacist. We developed this novel approach as part of a project commissioned by the Department of Work and Pensions.

Most people received the information they needed from the group sessions. Less than one third of the attendees went on to have an individual session. Those who attended individual sessions were people with more complex issues, including people who are classed as ‘high cost’ e.g. frequent attenders at G.P Surgeries, those on multiple medications, and people with substance misuse issues. In these individual sessions, participants felt able to share information on their medicines, treatments and overall wellbeing that they haven’t previously shared with anyone. For some this included areas where they felt unsafe and had not talked about to professionals before. On several occasions, we have been able to provide information on safeguarding options, and maintaining safety. This included signposting people to available services, they previously either avoided or had been unaware of.

The success criteria for the DWP funded project, which were all met, related to helping people back on the route to employment. By collecting accounts from attendees, we also found that our sessions appeared to lead to a reduced number of prescribed medicines and more appropriate contacts with services. Indicating that adopting this approach as part of core services will be self-sustaining.
Stage of Development:
Close to market - Prototype near completion and final form may require additional validation/evaluation and all CE marking and regulatory requirements are in place
WMAHSN priorities and themes addressed: 
Long term conditions: a whole system, person-centred approach / Innovation and adoption / Patient and medicines safety
Benefit to NHS:
Benefits identified to date include improved adherence with medicines; improved quality of life; reduced unnecessary medicines; identification and actions on previously unreported patient safety issues. A thematic analysis of the feedback showed that out of the 28 people who had an individual session 19 were given advice on referral pathways; 9 signposted to existing resources (such as Medicines Use Reviews) and trusted source of information; 9 people were recommended to ask for a clinical medicines review, 4 were advised on options for opioid switches and 10 on dosage, side-effects or interactions. This prompted one person to comment:
‘In the support session you listened to me, and helped me work out what I needed to say. I gave the notes to my G.P. who changed my medicines and made the referrals you suggested. I now no longer walk with a stick, and feel a lot better. I thoroughly recommend these sessions’
 
We also carried out a thematic analysis of the presenting issues in the individual sessions, based on the feedback and on our reflective log. The top five issues were mental health problems (13/28); suicidal ideation (5/28); use of non-prescribed medicines, including borrowed and illicit substances (5/28); anger issues (5/28); previously unreported risk or safeguarding issues (3/28).
 

In summary, we found three main areas of benefits:
  1. Addressing the fact that specialists in different areas of medicine only ever review the medicines they have prescribed. So people end up with a continuation of medicines they don’t need and often medicines which make things worse.
  2.   Helping bring out the things people don’t normally tell their doctors (we all do this). In the jargon this is called ‘intentional non-adherence’. This increased trust and openness seems to be because we deliver these reviews as part of larger project led by users of services, so by the time we see people they have built up a degree of trust in the process.
  3. We’re finding some unexpected patient safety benefits. We’re learning that, as a result of the way the sessions are carried out, some people feel able to share information on their medicines and treatments with us that they haven’t previously shared with anyone. On a number of occasions we have been able to give advice on medicines safety and signpost people to services they need, but had previously either avoided or been unaware of.
 
Initial Review Rating
4.20 (2 ratings)
Benefit to WM population:
As a result of the sessions and individual reviews, this approach can be tailored to promote local services and resources, and meet the needs of differing patient groups from all backgrounds.
Current and planned activity: 
Onoing projects in the South West and devleoping links to London Trusts. Presented to NICE Mediciens and Prescribing Associates.
What is the intellectual property status of your innovation?:
The name Patient Led Clincial Education (TM) related educational materials, governance policies and procedures are the property of Care Right Now CIC.
Return on Investment (£ Value): 
medium
Return on Investment (Timescale): 
0-6 mon
Ease of scalability: 
3
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Steve Turner 16/01/2017 - 12:40 Publish 2 comments
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Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
Whose Shoes? uses a range of scenarios and topics to help staff explore the concerns, challenges and opportunities facing different groups. So you can walk in their shoes understand the process and issuses associaed with making (an informed) decision
Overview of Innovation:
Whose Shoes? is a popular approach to co-production within the NHS, endorsed and actively supported by the Patient Experience team at NHS England and the Transformation team within NHS Improving Quality, as well as local authorities, universities and other public services. It is a flexible tool that can be adapted (through bespoke partnerships) to a wide range of topics and challenges. The original board game, launched in 2008, explored issues around the emerging personalisation agenda.
A person-centred and values-based focus remains central to all development.
New material is being developed through strong collaborations with passionate people, fired by a very strong social media presence and networking capability. Whose Shoes looks at issues from different perspectives and triggers crucial conversations, with real ‘light-bulb moments’ as participants come together as ‘people’ rather than roles and work together to find solutions to the issues that matter to them. Getting as wide a range of participants as possible around the table cuts across boundaries and flattens hierarchy.
The relaxed approach creates the conditions for ‘service users’ to contribute as equals in a relaxed environment which is conducive to open, honest exchanges. People are empowered to lead rather than simply contribute. There is a strong focus on action and sharing good practice widely, with participants encouraged to make pledges and to share good practice through stories and case studies and to promote these through social media. Graphic recording of Whose Shoes workshops is very popular with hospitals using the records as action plans.
The maternity version of Whose Shoes? has been developed in partnership with the London Strategic Clinical Network and NHS England. It was piloted in five London hospitals. Workshops are now spreading – including other London hospitals, Guernsey, Leeds, Cumbria and Manchester.
Whose Shoes? material to improve communications between children and young people, their parents and healthcare professionals has been co-produced with Great Ormond Street and HENCEL.
Scenarios to promote dementia-friendly communities and understanding by NHS staff of the challenges of living with dementia have been produced through partnerships with Skills for Health and an Age UK consortium. Integration scenarios are used in the Darzi programme. Bespoke scenarios around other areas of patient experience (e.g operating theatres) is being trialled with Kingston Hospital
Stage of Development:
Market ready and adopted - Fully proven, commercially deployable, market ready and already adopted in some areas (in a different region or sector)
WMAHSN priorities and themes addressed: 
Long term conditions: a whole system, person-centred approach / Wellness and prevention of illness / Wealth creation / Innovation and adoption / Patient and medicines safety / Person centred care
Benefit to NHS:
“ Whose Shoes brings people together to have conversations that matter, the resources stimulate thoughts whichlead to new insights & importantly to actions through the power of human connection & the use of narrative. ..... The energy generated is tangible .......it’s sustained long after as the creativity of both the public and professionals in unleashed. I’d really recommend the approach as a vehicle for any service committed to ongoing improvement
#Hellomynameis… Kath Evans, Experience of Care Lead (Maternity, Infants, Children and Young People), NHS England
 
“ ‘Whose Shoes’ has been an incredible catalyst in Maternity care. Having set up 5 pilot workshops with the London maternity strategic clinical network there has been a tremendous ripple out to hold further workshops in other Trusts as well as the phenomenal change platform that is #MatExp.
The actions are far to numerous to list here, some examples: a  graffiti board …to give live feedback on services, decorating the maternity theatre ceilings to improve the environment for women undergoing Caesarean section (CS), optimal cord clamping ……. midwifery workshop to explore better collaborative working - the list is endless.
We have also used ‘Whose shoes’ in other areas of the hospital with success #KHFTWhoseshoes, improving  staff attitude & environment and patient experience in our main operating theatres & having a drop in session on administration at our Trust Open Day”.

Florence Wilcock, Consultant Obstetrician Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Chair of the London Maternity Strategic Clinical Network maternity experience subgroup.
 
"Whose Shoes is a creative opportunity to engage staff, women and patients in a process of improvement and enlightenment, The #MatExp social movement for change ... used in our failing maternity service to better understand the experiences of women, their birth partners & our staff.  The creative energy & ideas generated during our session were directly developed into practical actions & we have subsequently used the model of engagement in other clinical areas.  Whose Shoes played an important part in our improvement journey & is having a direct impact on outcomes for women, birth partners and staff"
At the time of engaging with Whose Shoes, Steve Hams ex-Interim Dir. of Clinical Governance & Chief Nurse for the Health and Social Services Department at the States of Guernsey, now Interim Dir. of Clinical Performance & Delivery, NHS Surrey Downs CCG
Initial Review Rating
5.00 (1 ratings)
Benefit to WM population:
t feels currently as though the West Midlands is largely missing out on what is now a popular, proven improvement methodology being adopted rapidly in other parts of the UK and now reaching out internationally. This tool is very different from the ‘same old’ , traditional ‘top-down’ consultation models. It is about real staff and patient engagement leading to rapid improvements – and people find it fun too!

The NHS benefits would be similar to other parts of the country but it would be easier and cheaper (travel, accommodation) to work in partnership with West Midlands (ie local) NHS Trusts / CCGs.

Also New Possibilities, the recommended graphic facilitators, with whom we work as very close business associates, are based in Birmingham.

Thus greater adoption in addition to helping, patients and helcare providers it would also allow our regionally based company to grow and develop new specialised products as well exporting this delivery process overseas e.g Currently exploring taking 'Whose Shoes Maternity' approach to Uganda.

Currently Adopted / Procured by:
  • NHS England: North region; East Midlands
  • Hospital Trusts include:
    • Kingston, Guy’s and St Thomas’s, Lewisham & Greenwich, King’s College, UCLH, Leeds, Croydon, Maidstone & Tunbridge Wells, Stockport, Manchester, NHS Cumbria, North Cumbria
  • Cheshire & Wirrall Partnership Trust
  • Guernsey HSSD
  • Great Ormond Street (partnership - CYPMeFirst masterclasses)
  • CCGs include: West Leicester, West Kent, Leeds
  • AHSN / Area Team: Wessex, Thames Valley
  • International workshops and talks delivered: Australia, Malta, France; Puerto Rico
See: www.nutshellcomms.co.uk for 'Case Studies' and other information.
Current and planned activity: 
  • Building on 5 pilot workshops (& Train the Facilitator session) carried out with NHS Eng. & the London Strategic Clinical Network supporting the new maternity experience; now spreading to hospital trusts across the UK
  • 12 Whose Shoes #dementiachallengers in March 2016 workshops across Kent, Surrey and Sussex, run by Age UK consortium, commissioned by HEEKSS
  • On-going partnership with Great Ormond Street Hospital to use bespoke scenarios in #CYPMeFirst masterclasses for multi-disciplinary health professionals working in paediatric services from many hospitals; the first 20 ‘Communications Champions, who are taking this into their own organisations; more being recruited (up to 100)  
Required activity
  • Procurement / Adoption of Whose Shoes? -  Across the W Midlands NHS Trusts, via workshops or via purchase of online/board game versions of Whose Shoes?
  • Collaborative work to personalise Whose Shoes? For particular projects or departments
What is the intellectual property status of your innovation?:
Design registered. UK Registration Design No. 4009563; Trade Mark (Whose Shoes): No. 2502651
Return on Investment (£ Value): 
Very high
Return on Investment (Timescale): 
6-12 mon
Ease of scalability: 
Simple
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Gill Phillips 01/03/2016 - 12:00 Publish Login or Register to post comments
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