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Innovation 'Elevator Pitch':
Life Echo is a therapeutic personal phonic map of patients positive memories to reconfirm and generate memory management and interaction and how they can approach death.
 
Overview of Innovation:
Wiggan has discovered the possibilities that phonic recordings offer social care and Life Echo could offer alternatives within therapy and the skills of hearing that can address deep emotional and mental struggles.
 
Life Echo will address some of the issues relating to dementia and bereavement. (Primarily in first stages, then into other areas) and that Life Echo will explore the impact of sound on mental and emotional wellbeing. 

Previous activity has been building the project on the notion that hearing is one of the last senses to leave when a patient is terminally ill, this could possibly change how people interact with their own memories and how they can approach death.
 
This first stage of the project had shown it has great potential to become part of the service provision in end of life care and could be rolled out beyond the local area to become citywide and possible a regional or national project.
 
Positive memory trigger points with individuals receiving end of life and palliative care at the John Taylor Hospice in Birmingham and early sufferers of dementia to create ‘Life Echoes’ or personal phonic maps create this work.
 
The process encourages patients to reconfirm or establish memory routes, generating deeper, more intensive memory emersion through sound recall.
 
Life Echo is the sound of patients positive memories, as they consider an age or time period that has a positive significance for them, for each person this will be different and unique.
 
The Life Echo is an experience, alone or with family/ carer/staff. It is not a sound track of sound effects, but an abstract, therapeutic sound narrative based on the data shared by the patient.
 
 
This programme impacts upon end of life care and enhances the possibilities of ‘dying well’, it leaves a tool for the participant, a legacy for the family and potentially offers a process to delay the early on set of dementia.
 
Life Echo has the potential to become part of the service provision in end of life and dementia care. 

Life Echo is at inception/ R&D phase, so measurement guidelines are not yet fully formed. Anecdotal evidence, through film recordings and written documentation suggests that participants are extremely positive towards their experience however, this positivity needs to be formalised in order to establish clear frameworks for assessing success. 

The next step is to evaluate the impact of Life Echo on user, carer and family and develop a digital self perscription version
 
 
Stage of Development:
Evaluation stage - Representative model or prototype system developed and can be effectively evaluated
Similar Content1
Overview summary:
Brush DJ is an app designed to motivate children to have an effective oral hygiene routine by making tooth-brushing fun! The main feature of the app is a timer, which plays 2 minutes of music taken at random from the user’s device or cloud. The app also contains the evidence-based oral health information given in the Public Health England document ‘Delivering Better Oral Health’.  Reminders can be set to prompt at least twice a day brushing, when to change toothbrushes and visit the dentist.   
Challenge identified and actions taken :
Approx 26,000 children are admitted to hospital each year (England) to have decayed teeth extracted under general anaesthetic, the most common reason for children between 5 & 9 to be admitted to hospital. At least 50% of NHS dental budget is spent on treatment of preventable disease c.£1-1.5bn p.a. (England) with £30m spent on hospital tooth extraction for children aged under 18, these costs don’t include loss of income/productivity for parents/carers & lost school hours or the psychological cost of treatment to all involved.
 
The Brush DJ app is free (no in-app purchases or adverts). Videos showing how to effectively use a manual toothbrush, floss & interdental brush can be watched for free on YouTube. Using an app to raise awareness of evidence-based oral health information has financial advantages over methods such as leaflets as there is no printing, storage, distribution cost associated with an app. Apps are instantly scalable & updatable with the cost of producing one app being the same as any multiple, unlike a physical product. Because an app can use local reminders generated by the app itself they have an advantage over text message reminders, which have been used to motivate better oral health.  
Impacts / outcomes: 
The Brush DJ app has been already been downloaded in 193 countries on to 246,000 devices and received mainly 5 star reviews in the app stores https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/brush-dj/id475739913?mt=8 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=uk.co.appware.brushdj&hl=en .  Diffusion of the app can be measured by the number of downloads it achieves.

The main measure of success of the Brush DJ app at a population level will be if there is a fall in the number of decayed, missing or filled teeth reported in the Nation Dental Epidemiology Programme for England, oral health survey of five-year-old children and a reduction in the number of children attending hospital for tooth extraction under general anaesthesia.

The information given in the app comes from the Public Health England document ‘Delivering Better Oral Health – an evidence-based toolkit for prevention’ https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/delivering-better-oral-health-an-evidence-based-toolkit-for-prevention . PHE have reviewed the app and have no concerns.

The next step in the development of the app will be to include software to measure when users open the app, how long they stay on each screen and if they uninstall the app. The data obtained from this would be used to improve the user experience.

Research is soon to begin to measure the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the app in comparison to traditional methods to motivate an evidence-based oral hygiene routine in children. This will involve a randomised control trial comparing the app to traditional methods by monitoring levels of plaque on children’s teeth in the short and long-term.
Which local or national clinical or policy priorities does this innovation address:
Wellness and prevention of illness.
Supporting quote for the innovation from key stakeholders:
The City of York council has started to promote the app in children’s centres and reception classes. http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/14306759.Free_dental_packs_for_York_children__as_city_tries_to_tackle_shocking_child_tooth_decay_figures/?ref=fbshr
Plans for the future:
The next step in the development of the app will be to include software to measure when users open the app, how long they stay on each screen and if they uninstall the app. The data obtained from this would be used to improve the user experience.
 
The main barrier to scaling the app is lack of awareness – this could be reduced by all those involved in health in the WMAHSN region actively promoting the app at every contact with patients and the public who would benefit from using it - making every contact count.
 
I have recently been appointed as one of the inaugural NHS Innovation Accelerator fellows http://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/innovation/nia/ to try to get the app adopted at a scale and pace in the NHS. With the programme comes a bursary which is being used to improve the app and raise awareness.  To make the app sustainable in the future funding will be needed to cover the cost promoting and maintaining the app.
 
Research is soon to begin to measure the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the app in comparison to traditional methods to motivate an evidence-based oral hygiene routine in children. This will involve a randomised control trial comparing the app to traditional methods by monitoring levels of plaque on children’s teeth in the short and long-term. 
 
The main measure of success of the Brush DJ app at a population level will be if there is a fall in the number of decayed, missing or filled teeth reported in the Nation Dental Epidemiology Programme for England, oral health survey of five-year-old children and a reduction in the number of children attending hospital for tooth extraction under general anaesthesia.
Tips for adoption:
The City of York council has started to promote the app in children’s centres and reception classes. http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/14306759.Free_dental_packs_for_York_children__as_city_tries_to_tackle_shocking_child_tooth_decay_figures/?ref=fbshr
Contact for further information:
Ben Underwood - ben@brushdj.com
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